MINIATURE SCHNAUZER PUPPIES

Protective. Outgoing.


Although the Miniature Schnauzer was originally bred to be a ratting dog, it has long been known to be a wonderful family member, jolly and happy, affectionate with its people, and generally good with children. Because this dog is a natural hunter, think twice if your home includes smaller pets, from gerbils and hamsters to rabbits and cats. Most Schnauzers are unable to overcome their ratting instincts. That aside, this breed is intelligent and gregarious and will never shy from being the center of attention. They are vocal enough to be a great watch dog and friendly enough that they won’t be useful on guard duty. “Schnauzer” means small beard, and that absolutely fits this gruff-looking pup that can remind you of a little old man. A well-trained, socialized Mini Schnauzer is a fun companion to have around, and always ready for action.

Temperament

Smart & Vocal
Because Miniature Schnauzers are active, smart, and devoted to their people, they can be wonderful family pets.

They make great watch dogs, although their natural friendliness makes them more of a barker than a biter.

This breed is smart and easy to train, and they will love playing with interesting toys. You will certainly want to keep them occupied, as bored Schnauzers will find a way to entertain themselves.

Your Mini Schnauzer wants to be your family’s guardian, so they can often be suspicious of strangers and overly vocal.

Their confidence can sometimes cause them to forget their size and try to scuffle with larger dogs.

Appearance

Spritely & Mustachioed
Miniature Schnauzers have a square build and a rectangular-shaped head with high-set, v-shaped ears. Their dark eyes are oval-shaped under bushy eyebrows.

Their proportionate muzzle has a blunt ending with a bushy mustache and beard, and teeth that meet in a scissor bite.

This breed’s forelegs are parallel and straight with short, round feet. The well-muscled hind legs have slanting thighs set below shoulder-level. They carry their tails high and erect.

Mini Schnauzers sport a double coat with a bristly topcoat and a soft undercoat. They come in many colors:
  • Black
  • Salt and Pepper
  • Chocolate
  • White
  • Parti (white coat with colored patches)

This breed has a minimal shedding rate and therefore can be a good choice for those with allergies. (But let's be clear: there is no such thing as a truly hypoallergenic dog.)

Typically they are 12 to 14 inches tall and weigh 12 to 20 pounds.

Exercise

Medium Activity
Your Mini Schnauzer is playful and energetic, so they’ll need moderately intense exercise to keep them happy and healthy.

They love walks and jogs and playing with children, and they will love having the run of an enclosed space. Because your Schnauzer has a hunting instinct, keep an eye out for any smaller animals (like cats, squirrels, and rabbits) that might wander into their yard. Most Schnauzers are unable to overcome their instinct to kill small animals. (You will also want to keep them far away from any smaller pets in your house like hamsters or gerbils for the same reason.)

Schnauzers can do well in apartment and urban living as long as regular exercise is prioritized.

We recommend 60 minutes of activity a day and 6 miles of walking a week.
History Miniature Schnauzers were originally developed in the 1800s in Germany as a small farm dog with a talent for ratting. They are thought to be the result of crossbreeding smaller Standard Schnauzers with Affenpinschers and Poodles to create a smaller Schnauzer more suited to catching rodents, herding, and guardin

Miniature Schnauzers were originally developed in the 1800s in Germany as a small farm dog with a talent for ratting. They are thought to be the result of crossbreeding smaller Standard Schnauzers with Affenpinschers and Poodles to create a smaller Schnauzer more suited to catching rodents, herding, and guarding property.

The breed is classified as a Terrier in America. A Mini Schnauzer called Dorem Display was the first of its breed to win best in show at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, and in fact, nearly all of the breed in America can trace its lineage back to that winsome pup.

After World War I, the Miniature Schnauzer’s popularity soared, and at one point it was the third most popular breed in the United States. It was brought to the U.S. in 1924 and accepted by the American Kennel Club just two years later.

Major health concerns to be aware of:

  • Pulmonic Stenosis
  • Portosystemic Shunt
  • Pancreatitis
  • Sick Sinus Syndrome

Minor health concerns to be aware of:

  • Bladder Stones
  • Cushing's Disease
  • Schnauzer Comedo Syndrome

This breed will require brushing two or three times a week to prevent matting. You may also want to get them professionally groomed every eight weeks or so to keep the coat healthy and attractive. They don’t shed heavily, and their undercoat helps to make this breed hypoallergenic. Inspect and clean your pup’s ears while you’re grooming to keep them free of dirt and prevent infection. As with all dogs, your Mini Schnauzer needs their teeth cleaned regularly to prevent dental disease.

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