TEACUP-TOY YORKIE PUPPIES

Confident. Vocal.


Today’s Yorkshire Terrier is a very small companion dog, able to be easily stashed under arms and in handbags. Original Yorkies were much bigger than those we know today. They were working dogs who hunted vermin and small rodents. They are likely to be a mixture of several other Terrier breeds including Dandie Dinmont, Manchester Terrier, Skye Terrier, and the now-extinct Paisley or Clydesdale Terrier, with a dash of Maltese. The breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1885.

Temperament

Loyal & Inquisitive
They may be small in stature, but Yorkies are mighty in personality.

They are not necessarily recommended for families with young children, but with early training and socialization, they can thrive in any home.

They are active and confident, loyal and inquisitive. They love attention, and because they’re very smart, training is fairly easy.

These dogs are meant to live inside with you because their diminutive size makes them vulnerable to the elements.

Small breeds are typically known as yappy, and Yorkies are certainly known to bark. They make great watch dogs for this reason, and early training and regular exercise can help you manage it.

Appearance

Small & Silky
Yorkies have small, flat skulls with small, v-shaped ears. They have medium-sized eyes that sparkle with sharp intelligence and a complete scissor bite.

Yorkie coats are straight and glossy, and they have a silky texture. Because our purebred Yorkies have no undercoat and shed very little, they are considered hypoallergenic and could be a good choice for those with allergies.

Puppies are typically black with brown fur on their ears, muzzle, and paws. It’s normal for their fur to change color as they age. Some will take on a blue tint while others can be more blonde.

Teacup-Toy Yorkies typically weigh between 3 and 7 pounds and stand just 8 to 9 inches tall.

Exercise

Medium Activity
Bred to work, Yorkies require both mental stimulation and physical exercise daily to keep them happy and healthy.

We recommend 30 minutes of activity a day and about 6 miles of walking a week.
History The Yorkshire Terrier was named for its place of origin in England. When the Industrial Revolution brought Scottish immigrants to England in search of work, they brought with them the now-extinct Old English Toy and Waterside Terriers, which were well-suited to hunting rodents. Pairing those two created some of

The Yorkshire Terrier was named for its place of origin in England. When the Industrial Revolution brought Scottish immigrants to England in search of work, they brought with them the now-extinct Old English Toy and Waterside Terriers, which were well-suited to hunting rodents. Pairing those two created some of the breed’s early refinements. They eventually arrived in the United States, and the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1885. They became popular for their showmanship and their affectionate personalities.

Major health concerns to be aware of:

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Minor health concerns to be aware of:

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The Yorkshire Terrier’s coat has long, fine hair that can easily become matted, so it will require daily brushing. Most owners clip the coat closely for a fresh, lower-maintenance look. Nails should be trimmed twice a month. Because small breeds are known to have dental problems in their tiny mouths, it’s important to brush their teeth daily to prevent both bad breath and gum disease.

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